District Launches Workforce Development and Job Training Website

The San Mateo County Community College District’s new workforce development and training portal, smccd.edu/workforce, offers critical job training and small business resources on one convenient website. Designed to help address the workforce crisis caused by COVID-19 in the Bay Area, the website launched this week. 

“Our community college team of dedicated workforce, entrepreneurship and training professionals stands ready to help San Mateo County thrive during these challenging times,” said Michael Claire, chancellor of the community college district. “We are ready to respond to the needs of the community, including job-seekers and businesses, and we are here for you.”

Help for Job Seekers
At smccd.edu/workforce, job seekers can find easy access to training programs for a number of careers that promise strong growth and stability in the Bay Area. Programs include UX design, human resources, child development, cyber-security, optician, facilities maintenance, cloud computing, project management, digital marketing and sales operations. Job seekers can choose  full and short-term academic and workforce programs, and can access career opportunities and coaching to prepare, apply and interview for positions.

Help for Small Businesses
Small businesses and entrepreneurs are especially hard-hit in this pandemic, so smccd.edu/workforce offers tools to help small businesses and entrepreneurs adapt and stay afloat during these critical times. The Small Business Recovery & Assistance Program offers virtual services including business management guidance, technical and targeted business assistance, networking, one-on-one consulting, job shadow opportunities, coaching and workshops. 

Help with Corporate Training
The smccd.edu/workforce website also connects companies to training programs for existing employees. Local employers can take advantage of numerous expert-led online workshop series including Working & Connecting Remotely, Leading & Managing Remotely, Business Writing, Work From Home Technology, Cross-Cultural Competency, and Diversity & Inclusion. Other services include executive coaching and workshops as well as customized training for leaders and teams in any type of organization.  

The Workforce Development and Training Web Portal was created in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on San Mateo County community members, entrepreneur and businesses. SMCCCD formed a task force of partners included workforce, training and entrepreneurial leaders from Cañada College, College of San Mateo, Skyline College, the Bay Area Entrepreneur Center (BAEC), and Community, Continuing & Corporate Education (CCCE). The task force has initiated a county-wide marketing campaign to build local awareness.

Learn more at smccd.edu/workforce.

Free Drive-Up Wi-Fi Now Available for SMCCCD Students

The San Mateo County Community College District now offers free Wi-Fi access for students at all three campuses. The new “Drive-Up Wi-Fi” service allows students to park in a specially designated parking lot on the campus of their choice, where they can access Wi-Fi to attend online classes or do schoolwork.

The program was made possible by an all-District team of staff and administrators who have been working to design a system that provides convenient student Wi-Fi access while maintaining District health and safety requirements during the pandemic.

Reservations are required. Students can pick the campus most convenient to them, fill out the Eventbrite reservation form, print or download their Eventbrite ticket, and follow the instructions. Restrooms are available. Students have in/out privileges for the Drive-Up Wi-Fi lot between 6am – 8pm.

Drive-Up Wi-Fi Website/Reservations

Student Drive-Up Wi-Fi Hours
Cañada College:
Monday – Friday, 6 am – 8 pm

College of San Mateo:
Monday – Saturday (except Fridays), 6 am – 8 pm

Skyline College:
Monday – Friday (except Wednesdays), 6 am – 8 pm

Student Drive-Up Wi-Fi Rules

  • Review COVID-19 symptoms and stay home if you are sick 
  • Make a reservation on Eventbrite and bring your ticket to campus
  • Check in at the Public Safety Access Point
  • Drive to the Wi-Fi lot and park in any space with a GREEN cone
  • Only members of the same household in each vehicle
  • All vehicle occupants must remain in the vehicle except to use restrooms
  • Read and follow all rules on your Eventbrite ticket
  • Abide by the Student Code of Ethics

For more information, please see the District Drive-Up Wi-Fi website.  

San Mateo County Community College District Courses Remain Mainly Online for Spring 2021 Term

The three colleges of the San Mateo County Community College District – Cañada College, College of San Mateo and Skyline College – will continue to hold courses in online and distance education modalities, as well as provide most student services remotely, through the end of the Spring 2021 semester. The San Mateo County Community College District Board of Trustees formally ratified the decision in their meeting on Sept. 23.

“The COVID-19 pandemic continues to disrupt higher education along with every other sector,” said SMCCCD Chancellor Mike Claire. “This decision allows our employees to plan ahead for a successful spring semester, and it lets students know what to expect. Staying online is the best way to keep our students, faculty, and staff healthy and safe.”

The Board’s decision was based on the recommendation of the Chancellor and supported by a recommendation from the District Academic Senate. Faculty, staff and students have expressed a need to have as much time as possible to plan for the spring term.

Most employees will also continue to work remotely through May 2021.

In-person instruction will continue for certain essential infrastructure sectors–healthcare, emergency services, and transportation fields, as well as critical STEM labs in key transfer areas, and to meet licensing requirements for career education programs–in order to train first responders and healthcare workers to address urgent community needs and to provide direct pathways to employment. Due to criteria set by the State that include requirements for social distancing, classroom/lab sanitization procedures, and other health precautions, the number of people at SMCCCD campuses will be kept at a minimum.

During summer 2020, Colleges provided a massive professional development program to train instructors in online education. Approximately 600 college faculty participated, as well as dual enrollment faculty, faculty instructors, and other support staff. The training program was supported by more than $1.4 million in Federal CARES Act funding as well as District funds.

The District has launched a number of programs to help students cope with the ongoing crisis. Drive-Up WiFi service is available six days a week to help students attend online classes and complete their schoolwork. In a partnership with Second Harvest of Silicon Valley, the District now offers free food distribution on Wednesdays at Skyline College, and Fridays at College of San Mateo. The District is distributing more than $4.2 million in federal CARES Act funding to students to assist with financial challenges. The three Colleges have been distributing loaner Chromebooks, WiFi hotspots and other supplies to students. Healthcare services are available via telemedicine free of charge to students.

EMPLOYEES: What to Do in Case of Power Shutoffs

PG&E has announced the possibility of Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS) this week. Here is what the District is doing to prepare, as well as guidelines for what to do if you lose power.

In the event of a power shutoff, online classes and meetings should continue as scheduled, but you should have a plan for how to reach your dean or supervisor if you lose power. Let them know what is going on. Instructors, deans, and supervisors are asked to make every effort to be flexible and understanding with anyone who is unable teach, learn or work due to a power shutoff.

Online classes
Online classes will continue as scheduled in the event of a PSPS. For detailed guidance on handling a PSPS, please see the District Academic Senate Guidance Statement on Major Power Outages.

Offices and meetings
Employees working from home should continue to do so as long as they have power. All meetings will continue unless announced otherwise by the meeting host.

Campus Procedures
The District communicates daily with PG&E and will have advance notice of any planned outages at any District campus or the District Office. If/when PG&E notifies the District of an upcoming outage, the District may close the affected location as a safety precaution. In the event of a power shutdown on a campus, face-to-face classes and all other campus operations will be closed. Some essential employees may still be required to come to work to preserve campus safety and facilities.

The District will notify students and employees of any campus closures. Updates will be posted at emergency.smccd.info.

What to Do in Advance of a PSPS

  • Make sure your dean or supervisor has your cell phone number.
  • Instructors and offices should create a phone tree in order to contact people during a power shutdown.
  • If you live in an affected area, notify everyone at the beginning of your classes/meetings that you could lose power.
  • Charge your phone and devices in advance.

What to Do if You Lose Power

  • Email or text your dean or supervisor to let them know.
  • Instructors should notify students on Canvas and encourage students to check in with their classmates.
  • If you are a meeting host, call or text a colleague in the meeting to let them know you lost power and that the meeting will be rescheduled.
  • If you are a meeting participant, email or text the meeting host to let them know you lost power and make arrangements to follow up when you have power.

Above all, please take care of yourself and others who are experiencing hardships due to a power shutoff. Please use patience and flexibility to allow students to complete course requirements, and to allow employees to complete their work.

Monitor updates at emergency.smccd.info.

STUDENTS: What to Do in Case of Power Shutoffs

PG&E may do Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS) this week. Here is what students should do if you lose power.

Online classes will continue as scheduled, as long as your instructor has power, but you should have a plan for how to reach your instructor if you lose power. Your instructor will make arrangements for you to make up assignments or other requirements once power is restored.

Face-to-Face Classes
In the event of a power shutdown on a campus, face-to-face classes will be canceled. The District will notify students of any campus closures.

What to Do in Advance of a PSPS

  • Make sure your professor has your cell phone number.
  • Make sure your Canvas notifications are set to “daily” and announcements to “immediately.”
  • Charge your phone and devices in advance.

What to Do if You Lose Power

  • Email or text your instructor to let them know.
  • Check in with your classmates and friends to make sure they are okay.

Above all, please take care of yourself and others who are experiencing hardships due to a power shutoff.

Monitor updates at emergency.smccd.info.

COVID-19 Grading and Refund Information for Fall 2020 Courses

STUDENT INSTRUCTIONS
For all COVID-19 refundable drop and withdrawal dates, please refer to your WebSMART under Class Schedule Summary.  The following outlines what these dates include in terms of fee refunds and grading:

Last Refund: Drop with a full refund including material, health services fees.

Withdrawal/End Date: Refund Enrollment Fee and Non-Resident tuition through the last scheduled class day prior to exam week. 

After the last scheduled class day, only the enrollment fee will be refunded EXCEPT for Non-Resident and International.

Section Refund Date: Drop with a full refund including material, health services fees.

Last Day to Drop with a Section Refund: Refund of Enrollment Fee and Non-Resident Tuition only.  Material, health, and other fees will be refunded.

Last Day to Drop Without Appearing on Transcript: Refund of Enrollment Fee and Non-Resident Tuition only.  Material, health, and other fees will not be refunded.

Last Day to Change To Pass/No Pass Grading Option: No fee refund applies – see counselor before considering

Last Day to Withdrawal with an EW:  Refund Enrollment Fee and Non-Resident tuition through the last scheduled class day prior to exam week. 

After the last scheduled class day, only the enrollment fee, Non-Resident and International will refund.  The Non-Resident and International student tuition will stop refunding one month after the term end date.

FACULTY INSTRUCTIONS
For all Covid-19 Refundable Drop and Withdrawal dates, please refer to your WebSMART under Class List of Registered and Waitlisted Students.  The following outlines what these dates include in terms of fee refunds and grading:

Refund Date: Drop with a full refund including material, health services fees.

Last Withdrawal Date: Refund Enrollment Fee and Non-Resident tuition through the last scheduled class day prior to exam week.  The Non-Resident and International student tuition will stop refunding one month after the term end date.

End Date: After the last scheduled class day, only the enrollment fee, Non-Resident and International will refund.  The Non-Resident and International student tuition will stop refunding one month after the term end date.

San Mateo County Community College District Food Insecurity Program Expands to Skyline College

More than 19,000 Families Have Received Food To Date

The San Mateo County Community College District Emergency Food Distribution has added a second location at Skyline College to its weekly services. The program launched on Wednesday, September 2.

The CSM food distribution has served more than 19,000 families since it began on April 3. With Second Harvest locations in the Bay Area running at full capacity, there was a need for additional locations. Skyline College’s SparkPoint Center partnered with Second Harvest to establish the new program.

The weekly Emergency Food Distribution Schedule is now:

Skyline College
Wednesdays, 11am – 1pm
Enter campus via Skyline Drive

College of San Mateo
Fridays, 11am – 1pm
Enter campus via West Hillsdale Blvd

The SMCCCD District Emergency Food Distribution continues to provide a critical basic need for the community during the COVID-19 crisis, helping to offset the effects of unemployment and school closures. The program has made a significant impact since starting in April:  

  • 19,100 families served
  • 754,540 pounds of food distributed
  • $1.13 million in groceries costs offset for families

Food boxes are supplied through a partnership with Second Harvest of Silicon Valley. Each family receives a 39-pound box of food worth about $60. The food distribution is open to the public and serves a large number of college students as well as community members.

Prior to the pandemic, Second Harvest of Silicon Valley was already providing food to about 260,000 people per month in the Bay Area. By June, that number skyrocketed to more than 500,000 people per month. The demand has remained at that level and is expected to continue for another 12-18 months. 

Other SMCCCD Food Distribution Programs
In addition, the District purchases and mails Safeway food cards, each worth $75-150, to about 800 food-insecure students each month. Since March, the district has sent more than 4,800 Safeway cards worth $467,000 to students who need food.

The San Mateo County Community Colleges Foundation has set up an emergency fund to support these efforts as well as emergency scholarships and other student needs. Please visit foundation.smccd.edu to support our local students.

View our story on YouTube

Visit Second Harvest of Silicon Valley

Statement to the SMCCCD Community on Racism and Violence

June 2, 2020

To Our SMCCCD Colleagues, Students, Community and Friends:

Like many of you, in reflecting on recent events that led to the tragic, senseless and preventable deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Sean Reed and Tony McDade, we are trying to find the appropriate words for our thoughts and emotions. While we know and understand what is happening across our country, we struggle to comprehend it.  It is vexing to start a note by admitting that we are at a loss for how to adequately convey our feelings; nevertheless, this is where we find ourselves.  

All we can say is if you are angry, then you are in good company because we are, too.  If you are heartbroken and in pain, then you are in good company because we are, too.  If you are struggling to understand a world in which this can continue to happen, we are, too.  If you feel helpless, we do, too.  If you want change and accountability, we do, too.  And if you want to stop the senseless killing, oppressing and marginalizing of people of color and you want to condemn racist, bigoted and hurtful words and deeds, then you are in good company because we do, too.

We understand that we must reconcile words and actions because both matter.  The words we say to one another matter.  The words we say about one another matter.  The words we say about our community and culture matter.  Those words we say are reflections of our values.  Those words inform and explain our actions, and taken together, define who we are and what we believe.

Let’s be clear about our values and beliefs.  We have always—and will always—fight racism and bigotry and homophobia and xenophobia and all transgressions against people where we find it.  We remain committed to ensuring our classrooms, our campuses and our offices are places where a person from any background can seek our trust and realize our kindness.  We value every person as a human being and believe in their right to exist, be treated with dignity, and to have resources they need to live safely and thrive.  We value a community and culture that builds social justice and ensures equity, diversity, opportunity and inclusion.

We have made meaningful strides in our District, and we have much more to do because we recognize that, like other institutions of higher education, we may unintentionally perpetuate structural racism or other forms of oppression.  We are committed to immediately and critically examining our policies, procedures and practices to eliminate those structures that perpetuate racism and present obstacles to progress.  We must engage in thoughtful, courageous and tough conversations about how we treat each other and how members of our District family and community are treated.  We must take the time to truly listen to and understand our colleagues, students and neighbors with open hearts and minds. And we must be willing to step into the moment to stop wrongs where we see them and support those who need our help.

This will not be the only time we speak on the issue of dismantling racism and discrimination—it simply can’t be.  The range of emotions that are going through each of us is testament to the need for transformation and healing.  It is our responsibility—to ourselves and to our future—to harness this anger and frustration and hurt and despair, and use it to bring about real and lasting change. 

In that spirit, we will need your inspiration—your thoughts and ideas—on how to bring about that change.  But before we get to actions and solutions, we believe it is essential to express this panorama of emotions—through words, art, music and whatever means best allows you to express yourself.  Each campus will be holding a series of community conversations and all are encouraged to participate.

We can’t guarantee the work we have been doing and will continue to do will bring about the perfection we seek, because it won’t.  We can’t guarantee that our actions will be quick and precise, because they won’t.  But we can guarantee that if we all support each other and force the tough conversations and decisions, then we can give this struggle a hell of a fight.

In solidarity and hope,

Mike Claire, Chancellor
Jamillah Moore, President, Cañada College
Jannett Jackson, Interim President, Skyline College
Kim Lopez, Acting President, College of San Mateo
Jeramy Wallace, President, District Academic Senate
Mitchell Bailey, Vice Chancellor/Chief of Staff
Tom Bauer, Vice Chancellor, Auxiliary and Community Services
Aaron McVean, Vice Chancellor, Educational Services and Planning
Jose Nunez, Vice Chancellor, Facilities and Public Safety
Jing Luan, Provost, International Education
Bernata Slater, Chief Financial Officer
David Feune, Director, Human Resources

San Mateo County Community College District Launches Massive Professional Development Program to Prepare Professors for Online Instruction

The San Mateo County Community College District is providing summer professional development to 1,000 instructors, counselors, and student support staff at Cañada College, College of San Mateo, and Skyline College. The 25-hour training program involves technical training, mentoring and peer support to enhance online education across the community college district.   

With the COVID-19 pandemic forcing most Bay Area colleges to remain in online, distance education, or hybrid formats, the training will help to enhance the quality of the learning experience this fall.

The scope of the training program is massive, providing professional development for 650 college faculty and hundreds of counselors, staff, and administrators. The training program is supported by more than $1.4 million in Federal CARES Act Funding, as well as District funds.

“This is a sweeping program to support our faculty in providing the very best online education possible,” said Michael Claire, Chancellor of the San Mateo County Community College District. “I am so proud of the way our faculty, staff, and students made the sudden adjustment to online learning when the virus struck this winter. We are committed to working with our faculty to offer best-practice online courses and keep our students on track throughout this pandemic.”   

The new training program, called Quality Online Teaching & Learning (QOTL), provides foundational instruction in five key areas:

  1. Use of technology for teaching online
  2. Digital literacy
  3. Best practices for online communication
  4. Educational equity in online courses
  5. Student readiness through support resources

The 25-hour training program is led by highly experienced online teachers from the District’s own rank of faculty. These facilitators guide class cohorts through a set of standards that have been established by the state Online Education Initiative and a rubric for online courses developed by the Peralta Community College District.

The District is also involved in a large professional development program for San Mateo County schoolteachers. SMCCCD’s Community, Continuing, and Corporate Education division partnered with the San Mateo County Office of Education to design a summer series of two-week workshops designed to help teachers teach online. The program will prepare about 350 teachers this summer. See more at the Office of Education website.